Inch’s Dumbbell Program Minimum for Boxing [2 of 2]: The Dumbbell Jerk

Inch’s Dumbbell Program Minimum for Boxing [2 of 2]: The Dumbbell Jerk

Using the same dumb-bell (40 to 55 lb. in weight according to your strength and expertness), bring it to the shoulder with the right hand. Give it a slight jerk by first bending (only slightly) the legs, and then suddenly straighten them and push hard. As you do so, lean well over to your left, watching the dumb-bell carefully, the left hand being held out and away.

Inch’s Dumbbell Program Minimum for Boxing [1 of 2]: The Dumbbell Swing

Inch’s Dumbbell Program Minimum for Boxing [1 of 2]: The Dumbbell Swing

Place your left hand upon your left knee take hold of the bell with your right hand, and give it a little swing out to the front and slightly upwards. Allow it to return almost to the first position, but through the legs (keep it clear of the ground this time) and then swing the dumb-bell up to the front with a straight arm, right overhead.

“Jonglieren”: Team Kettlebell Juggling in Germany (1925)

“Jonglieren”: Team Kettlebell Juggling in Germany (1925)

Each man carries a kettle-bell that weighs about 43 American pounds. These teams go through an eliminating process similar to our trial feats. The opposing teams step toward each other, carrying the kettle-bells upon the right shoulders, and go through a series of march formations to the exhilarating strains of martial music. Each team member wears the uniform and colors of the club he represents.

Alan Calvert – The One-Arm Military Press (1915)

Alan Calvert – The One-Arm Military Press (1915)

Assuming that a dumbbell has been lifted to the shoulder, there are several ways of getting it to full  arms’ length above the head with one hand.

The simplest way – and incidentally the way that requires the most strength – is the “MILITARY PRESS.” A dumbbell (short handle) is generally used.